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How to Write a Romantic Banton

November 9, 2012

Image courtesy of Idea go at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Idea go at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

All romantic bantons, take note.

Did I ever tell you about that time I gambled and won a ticket to sail on the biggest cruise ship in the world, met this beautiful but confused rich girl who allowed me to draw her naked, and made her boyfriend so mad that he chased after me with a gun.

No?

Well how about that time I fell in love with a skinny vampire, and a sexy werewolf, only to find out that they actually don’t get along (who knew).

Don’t believe me?

Ok, so you probably guessed by now that the first story is actually Titanic, and the second is Twilight.

What do these two widely different stories have in common?

They both belong to the romance genre.

But what makes them a romance anyway, and such lady loving ones too?

It’s all about the conflict of interest. There must be a reason why our two characters should not be together.

Now if I were to tell you about that time when my girlfriend and I fought off a bunch of tuxedo wearing martial art experts in a virtual world during an epic battle to save mankind, and we did it all while holding hands, then that’s not a romance (not for women anyway).

There’s no conflicting interest there.

In Titanic, the conflict exists in the fact that the guy is a poor drifter, and the girl is rich with an even richer fiance. But turns out the poor guy is Mr. Do It Right. There is some pretty good action in there too, with the ship splitting in half and all.

In Twilight, the girl falls in love with, not just one, but two monsters (go figure). I think there is action in Twilight, I just never got to it.

If you would like to know more about the keys to conflict, check out this interesting article on Writers Digest.

So if you’ve ever wanted to write about a romantic banton, just remember that there must be a major reason why the two (or three) characters should not be together for your story to be classified in that genre.

Once the conflict is identified, you can add tall, long haired, barbarically sexy, matchstick striking jawed frog princes to your heart’s content.

So what do you think about the conflict of a romance? Let me know in the comments. And if you haven’t already, don’t forget to read Dirk the Juggernaut, this month’s trailer of my latest book, King Larsen.

Interested in receiving notifications for new articles? Subscribe to my weekly newsletter by emailing jevonknights@yahoo.com

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From → Writing Tips

One Comment
  1. narina permalink

    Sounds like you know a lot more about twilight and 50 shades than you let on lol (joke) seriously, some interesting stuff you wrote there though.

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